Highway Code Update

Highway Code Update

Promoting a more “mutually respectful and considerate culture of safe and effective road use that benefits all users.


Much of the new rules are common sense and likely conduct practiced by most. Most drivers are in cars – metal boxes that can accelerate quickly and travel at speeds that can seriously injure (or kill) those lower down the ‘hierarchy’ (below), less well protected.

  • Road User Hierarchy 

The most vulnerable should be treated with the greatest care; as ever, pedestrians have right of way the road hierarchy being:

  1. Pedestrians – always give way to.
  2. Cyclists – do not cut across their path, give way to
  3. Horse riders
  4. Motorcyclists
  5. Cars/taxis
  6. Vans/minibusses
  7. Larger passenger vehicles/HGVs

However, ALL road users, above, must have regard for their own and other road users’ safety.

  • ‘Opening a door to the danger of’ … other road users: 

Take care when opening your vehicle’s door.  The ‘Dutch-Reach method’ to open a car door; use the furthest away hand … it causes your body and head to turn in the direction from which other road users could be coming.  Give it a go, try to get into the habit … it works!

  • Cycles Mid Lane?

Yes – do not expect cyclists to ride adjacent to the kerb; they should be at least 1/2 meter from the kerb and could be in the centre of a lane.  Think of them as though a car; give a wide birth on the off-chance they have a ‘wobble’ or worse.  Better safe than sorry!

Cyclists have responsibilities too!  Do not put yourself or others in danger; be prepared to dismount and walk through hazards – pushing your cycle is a sign of intelligence; a considered, cautious approach.  It demonstrates you have ‘read’ the road and understand the risks.

The fact is drivers of 4-wheeled vehicles are better protected, is it unreasonable for them to be better protective of others?   ‘With great power comes great responsibility …

Confused about the changes to the Highway Code? Don’t be! Cycling UK has created a simple video explaining the key changes. You can find out more on their website: www.cyclinguk.org/highwaycode

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